A variety of special events are being held in conjunction with this production of Taking Liberties. Designed to expand upon themes raised in the play, the seminars and talkbacks will take place directly after performances (and include free refreshments).  

"This is a Canadian Actors' Equity Association production under the Artists' Collective Policy."

Beyond the Bedrooms of the Nation: Policing Public Sex in the 1970s and  1980s

Thursday, February 6

7:30 pm Preview

 

Our guest is Professor Tom Hooper of York University who will talk about the history and criminalization of sex in Toronto. Preview tickets are $20 and include show and refreshments. 

York University professor Tom Hooper is one of our nation’s leading experts on the Law and Sexuality. His advocacy, writing and media appearances have brought him a national profile, and facilitated an historical perspective to the conversation around how Canadian law has dealt with sexuality over the years.

In addition to his teaching at York, Dr. Hooper is frequently called on as a consultant, advocate, presenter, and panelist.  His advocacy work has taken him before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human rights. He has also made a number of appearances in national media outlets and  contributed web commentary and insight in print publications..

Dr. Hooper has written on a range of issues for an equally diverse group of publications. They include the Canadian Historical Review; the Journal of Canadian Studies; CBC; Torontoist; and ActiveHistory.ca. His doctoral theses was “Enough is Enough: The Right to Privacy Committee and Bathhouse Raids in Toronto, 1978-83.

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The Book Defenders!

Saturday, February 8

4:00pm Matinee

The 4:00pm matinee will be followed by a unique book club. CBC Producer, Katy Swailes (Writers and Company) will interview young women and men about what books they would defend today (as Margaret Laurence's novel The Diviners is defended in the play.) Ticket price of $30 includes show and refreshments.

Katy Swailes is a producer of award-winning film and audio. She recently co-produced the feature documentary film Untying the Knot, which premiered as part of the Hot Docs Cinema's "Films Changing the World" program. It was broadcast on the Documentary Channel in late 2019. Telling the story of an inspiring domestic assault survivor, the film has already won three awards on the festival circuit and is currently on a multi-city tour of India. Katy is a producer of CBC Radio's long-running literary program, Writers & Company, hosted by Eleanor Wachtel. 

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Gala Gala!

Saturday, February 8

7:30pm Show

Ticket price of $50 includes the show and a return of the "lavish" gala with food, fun and cash bar in the Robinette and Pioneer Kitchen Rooms of Campbell House.

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Naming Names

Sunday,

February 9

2:00pm Matinee

The 2:00pm Matinee is followed by a talk with Janice Neil, Chair of Ryerson's School of Journalism, on journalistic ethics and the naming of names. Ticket price of $30 includes show and refreshments.

Janice Neil is chair of the Ryerson School of Journalism, teaching students in the Bachelor of Journalism and Masters of Journalism programs. After joining the faculty in 2007, she served as Editor-in-Chief of J-Source.ca a national website providing information, commentary and resources on the Canadian journalism industry. Her earlier professional journalism career included working as the senior producer of CBC Radio 1’s Metro Morning, TVOntario’s Studio 2 and as a reporter for CBC in London (UK), Toronto and Regina. She was also a member of the journalism faculty at Carleton University.

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If Truth Be Told!

Wednesday, February 12

7:30pm Show

Join acclaimed playwright Beverley Cooper for a post show look at how censorship has played out in Ontario. Cooper's Blyth Festival hit, If Truth Be Told, was inspired by a series of attempts to censor works by both Margaret Laurence and Alice Munro. Ticket price of $30 includes both the performance of Taking Liberties and a special session with playwright Beverley Cooper. Beverley and actors will read from and talk about her play, If Truth Be Told, and join with Dave Carley in a conversation about the difficulties and responsibilities in moving historical events (like book bannings) from the headlines to the stage.

Writer, dramturge and teacher Beverley Cooper has written for TV, film and extensively for CBC radio drama. Plays include The Lonely Diner, Janet Wilson Meets The Queen (nominated, Prix Rideau Award) and If Truth Be Told. Innocence Lost: A Play about Steven Truscott was a finalist for the 2009 Governor Generals Literary Award, was on the Globe and Mail bestseller list (a first for a Canadian playwright) and has had highly acclaimed productions across Canada. Her most recent play: A Strange Christmas Tale was produced by the 4th Line Theatre in 2018. Beverley trained as an actor and has performed in theatres across Canada. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Guelph. Beverley also directs audio books and is the coordinator of The CASA Project, a charitable arm of the Playwrights Guild of Canada.

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How Do We Address Contemporary Holocaust Denial?

Saturday,

February 15

4:00pm Matinee

After the 4:00pm matinee, join Bernice Eisenstein, artist and author of the graphic novel, I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors; and Daniel Panneton of the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. They are in conversation with Esther Arbeid, Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre.
 

Bernice Eisenstein is a Toronto artist and author. Her critically acclaimed graphic novel I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors received the Jewish Book Award for Memoir (2007). The
publication was adapted into a National Film Board animated short film which was voted among Canada's Top Ten Short films of 2010 by the Toronto International Film Festival.
Correspondences (2013) was created with poet and novelist Anne Michaels. Her artwork has appeared in exhibitions in Europe and in the United States. Bernice is the Co-Chair of the Toronto Jewish Film Society.

 

Daniel Panneton is a public historian working in programs and education at the Sarah & Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. Much of his work focuses on denial on the internet, particularly on social media and through mediums such as memes. He can speak on the historical context of holocaust denial and holocaust education, how it has evolved in the 21st century, and how our post-truth environment has influenced its form and expression.


Esther Arbeid has been working at the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre at Spadina and Bloor for nearly two decades. A graduate of George Brown Theatre School (class of '94), she brings a background in theatre to all that she does. As the Director of Cultural Engagement at the JCC, Esther oversees the Canadian Jewish Playwriting Competition, the Toronto Jewish Film Society, Pottery, the Gallery at the J, music programs, Jewish celebrations and downtown Jewish Life, Hebrew and Yiddish language classes, and Seniors' programs. Esther could not do what she does were it not for a vast network of volunteers from the professional arts and culture ommunities in Toronto.

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Actors Host You!

Saturday, February 15

7:30pm Show

 

Join the actors follwoing the 7:30pm show in the Robinette and Pioneer Kitchen Rooms of Campbell House for a casual party with cash bar and appetizers. Come network with other actors in the city and share all of your theatre stories. Ticket price includes the show and party.

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Michael Bryant- Civil Liberties

Sunday,

February 16

2:00pm Matinee

Join Michael Bryant, Executive Director and General Counsel for the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, for a post-matinee talk and discussion about the state of civil liberties in Canada today. Ticket price of $30 includes refreshments.

 

Growing up on Vancouver Island, the cataclysmic wrongs perpetrated on indigenous people in my homeland of British Columbia left me angry and determined to work in the field of indigenous rights.  My grandfather was a dockyard worker, union leader, and local politician, like his son.  From him and his mayor-son, I learned about how democracy can empower people to either do good works, or abuse their power.  I’d take those lessons into my own political career, after which I continued fighting for indigenous rights, and began a career as criminal defence lawyer, often as a public defender, assisting the indigent, indigenous, and mentally ill.  I learned resilience from my mom, who has lived with Multiple Sclerosis for over a half century.  I learned humility, kinship and service from a Toronto homeless community and the remarkable recovery community in Canada.  I’ve learned about standing up to power through the extraordinary staff and board of directors at CCLA. 

 

Michael Bryant, BA, MA (UBC), JD (Osgoode Hall), LLM (Harvard) is the 7th Executive Director & General Counsel of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, founded in 1964.  Bryant was the 35th and youngest-ever  Attorney General of Ontario, and the longest-serving Attorney after Hon. Roy McMurtry and Ian Scott.  Mr. Bryant is a barrister certified by the Law Society of Ontario.  He has appeared before all levels of court, from bail courts as Duty Counsel through the Ontario Court of Appeal and Ontario Review Board as solo practitioner, to the Supreme Court of Canada as counsel at McCarthy Tetrault LLP.   Bryant was the Chief Negotiator for the Chippewas of Kettle & Stony Point, resulting in the historic 2016 Ipperwash Settlement Agreement.  In the '90s, Bryant clerked for the former Chief Justice of Canada, and served as Lecturer in Law at King’s College, London, and Adjunct Professor at U of T and Osgoode Hall.  In 2019, Bryant was named Canadian Lawyer's Top 25 Most Influential in the justice system and legal profession in Canada. 

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© 2020 by Taking LIberties Collective. Cast photos by the incomparable Sam Gaetz.
“This is a Canadian Actors’ Equity Association production under the Artists’ Collective Policy.”

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